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The Unstoppable Rise of Bikes

Drew Ocon

It’s hard to deny that bicycles are having a moment. Last year saw New York City, Chicago, Salt Lake City and Columbus all get bike-share systems of their very own — joining Boston, London, Paris, Dublin, Moscow, Hangzhou, Montreal and many, many other cities throughout the world. Increasingly, people are talking about bikes as a replacement for cars (and even trucks), debating the best ways to design bike lanes and bike-friendly intersections, dreaming up futuristic bike paths and ...

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  • Alessandra Rizzotti

    Great point that demonstrates if we can invest in bike lines/bike safety, people will see that it makes sense to ride bikes (vs cars): "A lot of it, though, comes from the fact that over the past 70 years, and especially over the past 30 or 40 years, we’ve been investing – personally and as a society – so heavily in this system where you have to drive a car, that it makes sense to people that you have to drive a car."

    Great point here too- if cars contribute to damaging roads, and drivers are only paying 50% of the cost needed to repair them, then maybe they should be paying more into the system. Not sure what the right thing to do is regarding that- but it seems like all of us, drivers or not, need to invest in biking infrastructure. - "And it turns out that the fees paid by drivers are only about 50 percent of the cost needed to keep the nation’s roads even in the bad state of maintenance that they are now."