Discover and share stories

of adventure, connection, and change making.

153 people think this is good

Discuss

  1. {{attachment.file.name}}
  1. {{fields.video_link.url}}

Ready to post! You’ve uploaded the maximum number of images.

Your video is ready to post!

Oops! Nice pic, but it’s just not our (file) type. Please try uploading a .jpg or .png image.

Well, this is embarrassing. Something went wrong when posting your comment. Care to try again?

That image is too large. Maximum size is 6MB.

Please enter a valid URL from YouTube or Vimeo.

Embedding has been disabled for this video.

{{c.errors.other}}

Posting comment...

  • Diego Parra

    Hi there! Cool thinking, I am part of a project a little similar to the Brownsville case applied to a neighborhood here in Bogotá, Colombia. So far it's working well, the community has participated positively and i hope we can give some good news in a couple of months. I can tell you the tips mentioned here are exactly what we have been living... so ... congrats to all the participants.

  • Audrey Bellis

    being a downtown LA resident, there has been such a movement for community and inter-connectedness for us to "Live Here, Work Here, Play Here". One of the biggest things that hasn't gotten enough attention in my opinion (and as a person in the apparel business) is the initiative Mayor Villaraigosa has brought us in helping to source local, keep jobs local and incubate local brands within the garment district community. Downtown is definitely "taking back it's city" and blossoming positively. Here is a brief article for those interested in the 'Made In LA' Initiative and the impact it will have for our local sub-community: http://articles.latimes.com/2012/oct/21/image/la-ig-lamade-20121021

  • Chris Howard

    This is a good one. I want to implement this with my school in Oakland. The school and the neighborhood needs to take pride in their community.

  • Jeff Nelder

    Great thinking! The segment on creation with the community is so important- when the community truly understands the elements of the product of brand definitions; sees their own desires and beliefs for the community reflected in that definition work; and realizes that their participation, whether active or tacit, has manifested in a dimensional brand product- the hopes and dreams for the community vision become real and ownership is activated. That's when we're 'firing on all six cylinders!'

  • Jeff Nelder

    Great thinking! The segment on creation with the community is so important- when the community truly understands the elements of the product of brand definitions; sees their own desires and beliefs for the community reflected in that definition work; and realizes that their participation, whether active or tacit, has manifested in a dimensional brand product- the hopes and dreams for the community vision become real and ownership is activated. That's when we're 'firing on all six cylinders!'

  • progressinc

    This is a prime example of taking back your neighborhood! Nashville's East Nashville/Five Points area is a prime example of what rebranding a neighborhood can do. The local movement for food, retail and entertainment is growing along the main corridor there in East Nashville. The historic houses and buildings still stand, and the independent spirit thrives there.

  • Designed Good

    We listened to the pioneers of Chatype (Chattanooga's font!) at the A Better World by Design Conference in Providence this fall. So interesting to hear about how design not only fosters pride, but actually brings diverse groups of people together within a single community.

  • Monica Kraeger

    This is so important for communities to feel proud of their history and their people. It also is an excellent way to foster street culture in neighborhoods and communities.

  • Michelle Goodwin

    I've seen this idea take root in certain neighborhoods in Providence, RI. Overall, I feel it helps the neighborhood associations build a tighter-knit community and generally gets people more active because they see the branding as a badge, something to be proud of. I would encourage other communities to think about branding.

  • Ehi Alonge

    A great and recent example of this is See No Evil, in Bristol in the UK. I could extol its virtues or bemoan its history and resulting and/or varying social and cultural issues, but would rather just celebrate its own branding story.. Watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gduIOPdeFhw

  • Carolyn Strauss

    In a recent Slow design knowledge highlight (relating to our current Kickstarter http://kck.st/11obs8t ), slowLab wrote about the 2006 book, 'England in Particular: A Celebration of the commonplace, the local, the vernacular and the distinctive* by Sue Clifford and Angela King of the UK charity Common Ground. Specifically, we quoted them in reminding us that "Scale is important, as is the question of who defines it." They point out that: "When things are looked at on a larger scale, sensitivity is lost. People become 'the public'; streets and fields become 'sites'; words and streams become 'natural resources.' These abstractions render professionals forgetful of lives, livelihoods and places."

    While this GOOD article clearly promotes tapping into local pride and forms of expression, it needs to be said that the branding idea is a risky proposition. Cloaking a locality with a slogan may have some positive effects, but it also threatens to mask the Slow-er aspects of place and/or to drown out other, subtler (but equally legitimate) expressions of identity. I'd really like to hear from a broader community here (and especially from communication designers) about whether/how a true and diverse expression of place can be achieved with this single brand identity approach.

    For those interested in Clifford and King's ideas, I highly recommend Common Ground's 'Rules for Local Distinctiveness' as a starting point: http://www.england-in-particular.info/cg/distinctiveness/d-rules.html . It's an A to Z of ideas for tapping into local identity, such as: "Personality often resides in subtlety. Look closely and often."... "Names carry resonances and secrets. Respect local names and add new ones with care. It is not good enough to call a new estate 'Badger's Mead'' when the badgers have been destroyed." … and "Don't tidy things up so much that the layers of history and reclamation by nature are obliterated. Let continuity show."

  • shroomer

    Logos are Very effective at 'Locking In' an Image . I have proposed one : The Star of David ,1/2 full of Palestinian blood , dripping onto an Olive Tree to help 'them' 're-brand ' and Solicit Olive Oil Products .

  • Vast Shadow

    Why would Chicago want to have Brownsville branded on their stuff?

  • Macy Parker

    I love this slogan/logo for Brownsville even more than the classic: "Brownsville - never ran, never will!"

    I used to teach in Brownsville, and I found that the Brooklyn Public Library special collection on Brooklyn history was a great resource for neighborhood history. There may be some interesting primary sources there for your team: http://www.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/brooklyncollection

  • lilyn69

    Lee-Sean, another way of thinking about social engagement was started by friends at Project Here. (projecthere.com) They've created events and exhibits and a portal that stress a sense of place and community-building. Centered in Petaluma, CA.

  • Adele Peters

    I'm really interested to see how the Brownsville project develops; this is such important work. These are all great examples of the power of visual design to create true change.