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  • April Junio

    When thinking about education reform, I get the feeling that what most people expect is a sort of massive solution to fix-all problems in one fell swoop. Is there a hidden gem to education reform? Is there a solution that will prove to be the key that fixes every fault found in the way society learns? An important first question to answer would be what education is, not based on the definitions of previous times, but rather based on how it is that people receive information in the current paradigm. Isn't that what education is, the process by which people receive information and learn things? At this point in time, education has become an institution in itself, the definition of an educated person is one that has completed all of the necessary loopholes as defined by state standards, with a slip of paper after acquiring a large amount of student debt. The problem is, this standard for being educated isn't accesible to a large amount of those who want to be considered "educated" because they can't afford it. Surely service learning provides opportunities to improve the quality of the educational system as it exists today, but what if the problem lies in the very structure of the educational system as it is today? I'm not sure if there is necessarily a way to reform the structure of education, but what I do know is that the process of learning itself has evolved. The growing number of MOOC's and the open access to the information necessary to learn through the internet is allowing people access to the resources necessary to "learn" without necessarily being "educated." What I am interested in seeing is whether education will be able to reform in enough to keep up with the pace of the evolution of learning.