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  • munmay

    It's tempting to shove the problems in our mouths, isn't there a reason why these invasive species appear besides just trying to be invasive?

  • Jesse McDougall

    Just to clarify, selling venison isn't illegal. Selling WILD venison is illegal with many good reasons—protecting the species, and monitoring the health of the meat, just to name two. McDonald's could sell a venison burger if it chose to invest in the fledgling (read: almost nonexistent) farmed venison industry.

    Also, I've never been clear on what constitutes an invasive species. It seems to me that it's a fancy term for "shit we never had here before." Ecosystems change and evolve. We can do our best to mitigate the change caused by invasive species—as in, grow local, buy local, plant local—but we can't stop the clock. And until we're able to stall or slow climate change, warm-weather species will come north.