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In the downtown heart of supposedly dead Detroit, there's actually been an influx of residents

Doris Yee

These infographics are from last year but still beautiful to look through. My hometown, Detroit, lost about 25% of its population in the last decade. But here are speckles of hope. Look at these maps: Blue mean Growth. Red means Good-bye. Other glimpses include San Francisco, New York, New Orleans, and Vegas.

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  • bnquick74

    The only issue here, and it is a big one, is the speculators. People are buying up entire blocks for $100,000 hoping to get rich. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but the people of Detroit need to call the shots when it comes to redevelopment.

  • Aishwarya

    That's good--it needs to be kick-started again. Lots of people lost their lives. I hope that they regain all of them.

  • Douglas Sellers

    Do you think this is due to all the incentives that Detroit has offered for people to move there?

    • Doris Yee

      If you're a transient from out-of-state, you probably have some kind of professional perk that drove you out there. For tech startups, it's a cheap place to work remotely and digitally (as buying an exposed brick warehouse is equal to or less than college tuition these days). For students, it might be a forced relocation (I'm pointing at those who went to UofM in Ann Arbor, which is a lifestyle hard to maintain if you don't find a steady job post-graduation.) But Detroit is not a new destination point for those 30+ years or older. The targeted age is from 18-28 years of age - when you have the most freedom to experiment and explore without making any lifelong decisions. It's not even a prime hub for empty nesters or the retired (but it'd be funny if it were).