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Got social problems? Business can help.

GOOD/Corps

Michael Porter makes the case that business can help tackle the world's biggest social problems. Citing examples such as Dow Chemical and Cisco, Porter observes that increasingly, businesses are moving away from seeing social problems as a side project and towards intentionally integrating them into their core business model.

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  • GOOD/Corps

    Scott, that is a great challenge to the business leaders today. Though perhaps the challenge that Michael Porter would put out is not to invest just money into social causes but to engage with social problems in a way that is aligned with the values and goals of their business. Ultimately, this sort of approach could generate an even greater social impact because they are making a real commitment to progress.

  • Scott Boggs

    Okay, fine, and Andrew Carnegie managed to set up 1,600+ town libraries in all U.S. states and territories with $46M of his own money in the 1910's. Which tycoons of the present day will step up to the plate at that level (loball calculating today's total relative value of those library construction projects at $187,000,000 [about $112,000 each])) to improve their own neighborhoods?