Discover and share stories

of adventure, connection, and change making.

189 people think this is good

Discuss

  1. {{attachment.file.name}}
  1. {{fields.video_link.url}}

Ready to post! You’ve uploaded the maximum number of images.

Your video is ready to post!

Oops! Nice pic, but it’s just not our (file) type. Please try uploading a .jpg or .png image.

Well, this is embarrassing. Something went wrong when posting your comment. Care to try again?

That image is too large. Maximum size is 6MB.

Please enter a valid URL from YouTube or Vimeo.

Embedding has been disabled for this video.

{{c.errors.other}}

Posting comment...

  • Ronit Drobey

    I am facing my own challanging ans exciting learning curve right now by atarting my own Life Coaching business, after coming from a family and school system that never prepared me to work for myself. The learning curve is incredibly steep, and I will persevere...but I can't help hoping that my son gets a different education. That he gets the tools he needs to by a dynamic, creative member of this brave new world. Of course, my starting a business is certainly changing the paradigm for him!

  • Jeff Hoffart

    10 years ago, students would have never said: "When I grow up, I want to be an App developer". In our current education systems, we are not effectively preparing youth for life, as we can never be sure what jobs might exist as students graduate and head into the world.

    I think developing skills, habits of mind and entrepreneurship qualities is key. I also think we should be shifting from a focus on "learning" to a focus on "becoming", fully embedding and integrating character education and whole-child development in everything we do.

    Beyond "teaching entrepreneurship", we should strive to help develop and foster "social entrepreneurs"! I have worked with my colleague Tosca Killoran over the past year to develop curriculum and a children's book (A is for Action: The ABC's of Taking Action) that helps children improve their self-esteem, gain confidence as problem-solvers, and inspire them to change the world. www.HelpTakeAction.com

  • Rose Man

    genius, I'm glad to agree. Especially with the part about tunnel vision. Tv in my opinion helps to tunnel vision but if we think outside the box at a young age it will only continue with us as were older. The world is ours and I agree a ton with this!! Thanks Ozkan for being inspiration to the youth!!

  • tafm1211

    http://www.polosaleuk.co.uk ralph lauren sale uk
    http://www.ralphlaureninlondon.co.uk ralph lauren london
    http://www.poloralphlaurenstoreuk.co.uk polo ralph lauren store uk

    http://www.dsquared2onlinestore.co.uk dsquared2 online store

    http://www.superdryoutletonline.co.uk superdry outlet online

    http://www.abercrombiefitchclothing.co.uk abercrombie fitch clothing

    http://www.lacoste-shirts.co.uk lacoste shirt
    http://www.abercrombiehoodies.co.uk abercrombie hoodie

  • yancey Quinones

    I was lucky to attend a brilliant high school in Los Angeles. I had an economics teacher who is actually the wife of a star Judge on T.V. She embed the concept of entrepreneurship into her students and reminded us of the "filtration system". We go through a filter system in order to be hand picked for the best companies to work for. We are conditioned to always strive high and score the best SAT points and get the highest GPA in order to be considered for a great univerthose kidssity and eventually an excellent IPO. Well my friends, today I run and operate a successful Coffee company and I owe it to my high school economics teacher for opening up my eyes. Its possible to guide those kids, all you have to do is get started. Thank you for your time.

  • Lisa Tringale

    I am so happy to have found this! And the comments that've come along. Thank You for the insight, I'm onto something new now : )

  • Jerliyah

    haha looks like someone's post button had a few issues, but you have great points dude. Im a high school senior and I've thought about this for a few years now. I would be incredibly happy to see this put to practical use. We need it, incredibly

  • BlueCollarCritic

    A more relevant and far more important question is how long before the government eliminates the ability for one to be an entrepreneur?

    Throughout the country local law enforcement have been shutting down lemonade stands and fining and or arresting the operators of these unlawful establishments engaged in pirate commerce. The local bureaucrats are shutting down as many acts of open trade and commerce as they can effectively ending the practice of non-government sanctioned commerce and trade. Some local governments have gone so far as to enact local statues that ban the use of cash purchases for used items such as the case with yard sales and the like. Sounds crazy doesn’t it? That’s why its been able to fly under the main stream media radar for the most part.

    Before worrying about where entrepreneurship is learned/taught you should first focus on how to protect your right to engage in free and open trade/commerce with fellow American citizens so that you will have a foundation from which to become an entrepreneur.

  • hmmartti

    Many schools in the Dakotas already teach entrepreneurship. But, contrary to the quote from the Sillicon Valley entrepreneur, in the case of many rural schools, the goal of building communities is more important that building fortunes.

    Check out the story here: http://dakotafire.net/?p=2262

  • Isabel Thottam

    I took an entrepreneurship course last year at my college and it definitely helps to get the resources and necessary tools when you haven't had any prior business courses. It's tough though because the entrepreneurial mindset is hard to keep attentive in a class when you'd rather use that time to develop your idea and business. But, I've been in business for a year now since I took the class and even if my business goes under, I think it's beneficial because you learn so much about business, leadership and communication that could benefit you later if you applied for a real job.

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"

  • Matthew Manos

    The huge issue is that students are bred from a very young age to think that we are supposed to go to school and get a job. It is very difficult to convince students that are already in the second half (junior/senior year) of their college career that getting a job is actually NOT the only possible route.

    If educators want to have success in creating a life-long effect on the mindset of our youth, they need to start early. By middle school, your only thought is "what high school will I go to." By sophomore year of high school, your only thought is "what college will I go to?" By junior year of high school, your only thought is "what will I major in?" After that, the natural progression of our concerns lead to: "what will I do after college?" That quickly becomes "where will I work?" - it is this exact moment, the moment that the question moves away from "what," and moves toward "where" that we are too late. If we can step in early (riiiight before the "what" becomes "where"), we can educate students around the tangible possibility of launching their own business, the question can change to "what will I make?"