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A 747 Upcycled into a Stunning Home and Animal Barn

Yasha Wallin

This beautiful, 4,000 square foot LA home was built from the waste materials of a 747 airplane. To build most of the home architect David Hertz utilized 4.5 million raw materials from scraps that what would normally have gone into the garbage. The main residence uses the wings and tail section of the plane for the roof. There’s also an art studio, guest house, and animal barn all made from the fuselage. A meditation pavilion was also created from the cockpit. Not a bad use of scrap metal.

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  • Rodrigo Mejia

    Fantastic. This is kind of the flip side of what happened in Belize earlier in the year. If you missed it, http://news.msn.com/world/workers-bulldoze-mayan-pyramid-use-rock-to-build-road a large portion of a Mayan pyramid to use the pulverized stone for a road project.
    What was lost can never be remade. But in the case of the 747, where the things we build are endlessly being pushed aside for newer models and just pile up as waste, this is a clever way to use what needn't be lost.
    (As a side note, I'm happy to see Los Angeles still active in innovative residential architecture.)

  • Armando Garma

    A gorgeous salvage job.

    I wonder how much was spent on transportation of the parts from wherever it was being scrapped to the job site. It must have been substantial, though still far cheaper and energy efficient than using raw materials.